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Home arrow Going Vegetarian arrow Veg News Archive
Veg News Archive - 2006 Print E-mail
News Archive - 2006

(To return to the main Veg News Archive page click here.)

Index to the articles on this page:

     HEALTH & NUTRITION
          (US) FDA OKs Food From Cloned Animals (28/12/06)
          (US) Message for men: Go veggie for sake of virility and longer life (15/12/06)
          (UK) High IQ link to being vegetarian (15/12/06)
          (UK) Abattoir fraud could bring BSE back to Britain (27/11/06)
          (US) Vegetarian Diet Chews Up Excess Flab (15/11/06)
          (US) Breast Cancer Risk Linked To Red Meat, Study Finds (14/11/06) 
          (NZ) Young vegan issues meaty challenge (22/09/06)
          (US) Meat Too Tough To Eat (28/08/06)
          (UK) There's No Risk to Humans from Soya (08/08/06)
          (US) The Truth About Losing Weight On A Vegetarian Diet (24/07/06)
          (NZ) New Zealand health scientists frustrated by poultry industry 'bullying' (23/07/06)
          (US) Exploring Diet’s Role in Colon Cancer Risk (18/07/06)
          (US) Foods that feed your brain (15/07/06)
          (US) Human 'Mad Cow' Could Cause Eventual Epidemic (22/06/06)
          (US) Vegan Women Less Likely to Have Twins (21/05/06)
          (UK) Mad cow disease 'a threat to tens of millions in Britain' (19/05/06)
          (US) Producers: Diet trends aggravate U.S. meat glut (16/05/06)
          (CN) China's happy vegetarian turns 120 (26/04/06)
          (US) Shocking News for Meat Eaters (26/04/06)
          (US) Blaming bats when man may be culprit (26/04/06)
          (DE) Eat more fruits, vegetables to avoid wrinkles (18/04/06)
          (US) Mad-cow firewall has gaps, consumer groups say (17/04/06)
          (US) US cattle markets shaken by suspect Canada mad cow (13/04/06)
          (UK) High meat diet 'can stress baby' (02/04/06)
          (US) New scientific review shows vegetarian diets cause major weight loss (01/04/06)
          (AU) Calcium, dairy unlikely to aid in weight loss (28/03/06)
          (PK) Vegetarian Diet Not Daunting to Adopt (23/03/06)
          (UK) Low-carb diets can be unhealthy (17/03/06)
          (UK) Switching to vegetarian keeps weight down: study (13/03/06)
          (AT) Bird flu spreads to Poland, infects cats in Austria (06/03/06)
          (US) Tainted feed blamed in Canada's mad cow case (03/03/06)
          (UK) More Britons worried about eating chicken: survey (01/03/06)
          (FR) Bird flu hits the land of foie gras (25/02/06)
          (AU) Bottom of the Harbour: The Law of Toxic Fish (15/02/06)
          (US) Not milk? (06/02/06)
          (US) 'Downer Cows' Entering Meat Supply, USDA Inspector General Says (02/02/06)
          (UK) Why red meat raises cancer risk (01/02/06)
          (US) Animal scares create demand for vegetarian ingredients (13/01/06)
          (UK) Eating veg 'cuts blood pressure' (10/01/06)
     ANIMAL WELFARE
          (US) Animal sentience: They think, feel pain (10/11/06)
          (US) Resident liberates the lobsters (13/10/06)
          (AU) The real price of our cheap eggs (03/10/06)
          (NZ) Urban consumers will steer animal welfare - Anderton (25/08/06)
          (NZ) Cruel hen cages move closer to phase-out (09/05/06)
          (UK) Dolphins ‘know each other’s names’ (07/05/06)
          (CN) Chinese scientists clone mad cow-resistant calf (26/04/06)
          (UK) Straw poll highlights key to healthy cows (11/03/06)
          (AU) Scientists designing the perfect dairy cow (24/02/06)
          (UK) Flying in the face of nature (22/02/06)
          (US) A sunless hell - Confronting the cruel facts of factory-farmed meat (20/02/06)
          (UK) Reality takes wing over bird flu (17/02/06)
          (AU) Tangled turtle dies, aged 150 (16/01/06)
          (UK) EU considers food labels to improve animal welfare (11/01/06)
     FOOD & PRODUCTS
          (AU) Plenty to beef about (29/05/06)
          (UK) New labelling guidance taps growing vegetarian demand (07/04/06)
     THE ENVIRONMENT
          (UN) Cattle produce more greenhouse gases than driving cars, UN report warns (29/11/06)
          (BR) Diet for a hot planet (24/11/06)
          (US) What you eat matters ... big time (03/11/06)
          (US) Meat Is a Global Warming Issue (24/08/06)
          (EU) A meaty subject for science (21/04/06)
          (US) Study Shows Vegan Diets Healthier for Planet, People Than Meat Diets (13/04/06)
     MISCELLANEOUS
          (IN) Saintly reptile: Crocodile turns vegetarian (26/08/06)
          (US) Animal intelligence resists definition (30/06/06)
          (US) Will consumers have a beef with test-tube meat? (27/03/06)
          (US) Atkins Nutritionals out of Bankruptcy (10/01/06)

----------

 

HEALTH & NUTRITION

(US) FDA OKs Food From Cloned Animals (28/12/06)

The government declared Thursday that food from cloned animals is safe to eat. After more than five years of study, the Food and Drug Administration concluded that cloned livestock is "virtually indistinguishable" from conventional livestock.
FDA believes "that meat and milk from cattle, swine and goat clones is as safe to eat as the food we eat every day," said Stephen F. Sundlof, director of the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine.
Officials said they don't think special labels are needed, although a decision on labeling is pending. Because scientists concluded there is no difference between food from clones and food from other animals, "it would be unlikely that FDA would require labeling in those cases," Sundlof said. Final approval is still months away; the agency will accept comments from the public for the next three months.
...
Carol Tucker Foreman, director of food policy at the Consumer Federation of America, said the FDA is ignoring research that shows cloning results in more deaths and deformed animals than other reproductive technologies.
Full story:
www.chron.com
Additional stories:
http://abclocal.go.com
www.seacoastonline.com
www.upi.com

(US) Message for men: Go veggie for sake of virility and longer life (15/12/06)

The single biggest step men can take to live longer is to adopt a vegetarian diet. Statistics are quite clear on this point. Vegetarians, male and female, outlive everyone else. They automatically eat more foods that promote longevity - vegetables, fruits and whole grains - to make up for the hole in their diet caused by avoiding the fat-laden meat that all-too-soon brings the male pump to a dead stop. And simply switching from red meat to chicken and fish doesn't help much, if at all. Both have plenty of cholesterol and a lot more fat than you would guess. The good news? Your arteries begin to clean themselves as soon as you start topping your pasta with marinara instead of meat sauce.
And eating less meat might also preserve your potency. By age 60, about one in four North American men has experienced impotency, and, in most cases, blocked arteries are to blame. Tofu anyone?... Eating less meat cuts your cancer risk. Vegetarians - even french-fry-eating, soda-guzzling, couldn't-care-less-about-health vegetarians - are 40 percent less likely to develop cancer than meat eaters. And if you're worried about losing your tough-guy image, keep the phrase "strong as an ox" in mind. After all, oxen are vegetarians.
Full story:
www.betternutrition.com

(UK) High IQ link to being vegetarian (15/12/06)

Intelligent children are more likely to become vegetarians later in life, a study says.
A Southampton University team found those who were vegetarian by 30 had recorded five IQ points more on average at the age of 10.
Researchers said it could explain why people with higher IQ were healthier as a vegetarian diet was linked to lower heart disease and obesity rates.
The study of 8,179 was reported in the British Medical Journal.
Twenty years after the IQ tests were carried out in 1970, 366 of the participants said they were vegetarian - although more than 100 reported eating either fish or chicken.
Men who were vegetarian had an IQ score of 106, compared with 101 for non-vegetarians; while female vegetarians averaged 104, compared with 99 for non-vegetarians.
...
Researchers said the findings were partly related to better education and higher occupational social class, but it remained statistically significant after adjusting for these factors.
Vegetarians were more likely to be female, to be of higher occupational social class and to have higher academic or vocational qualifications than non-vegetarians.
Full story:
http://news.bbc.co.uk
Additional story:
www.bloomberg.com

(UK) Abattoir fraud could bring BSE back to Britain (27/11/06)

Meat contaminated with BSE may be on sale throughout Britain because of widespread fraud at abattoirs, according to inspectors. Slaughterhouses are accused of swapping samples from carcasses to stop them failing tests to detect the disease.
The brain stems of all cattle more than 30 months old should be checked for contamination, but some abattoir owners are suspected of substituting the brains of younger animals to ensure the meat is sold.
Earlier this month, beef was removed from supermarket shelves across Britain because of the failure to test just one cow's brain for BSE.
People eating products infected with BSE can develop the incurable degenerative neurological disorder variant-CJD, which attacks young people in particular.
Full story:
http://news.independent.co.uk

(US) Vegetarian Diet Chews Up Excess Flab (15/11/06)

Where's the beef? Just forget it - and the chicken and fish, too.
Researchers have found that people who stuck to a vegetarian diet for at least one year lost more weight than those on a standard low-fat diet. And they shed considerably more excess flab than those who didn't stick with the meatless plan.
Additionally, levels of LDL "bad" cholesterol dropped after six months on the vegetarian diet, although they started to rebound when people went back to their normal eating habits a year later, says Lora A. Burke, Ph.D., professor of nursing and epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh.
If you adhere to the vegetarian diet, "you will lose weight and have significant improvements in your heart disease risk profile," she said.
Full story:
www.cbsnews.com

(US) Breast Cancer Risk Linked To Red Meat, Study Finds (14/11/06)

Younger women who regularly eat red meat appear to face an increased risk for a common form of breast cancer, according to a large, well-known Harvard study of women's health.
The study of more than 90,000 women found that the more red meat the women consumed in their 20s, 30s and 40s, the greater their risk for developing breast cancer fueled by hormones in the next 12 years. Those who consumed the most red meat had nearly twice the risk of those who ate red meat infrequently.
...
"There are already other reasons to minimize red meat intake," said Eunyoung Cho, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, who led the study. "This just may give women another good reason."
Cho added that the findings could be particularly important because the type of breast cancer the study associated with red meat consumption has been increasing. Eating less red meat may help counter that trend.
Full story:
www.washingtonpost.com
Additional story:
www.livescience.com/healthday/536057.html

(NZ) Young vegan issues meaty challenge (22/09/06)

An 11-year-old Christchurch vegan wants to challenge to a triathalon a visiting professor, who says meat is an essential part of a healthy diet.
Ella Soryl said she was powered by mandarins and avocados.
The Year 7 Shirley Intermediate School pupil, who has been a vegan all her life, was angered by Professor Robert Pickard's comments this week.
Pickard is the director-general of the British Nutrition Foundation and has been brought to New Zealand by the council for foods of animal origin, an industry body representing producers of milk, eggs, fish and red-meat products.
He has toured the country with a message that vegetarian, vegan and low-meat diets are unnatural and that the human body has a genetic propensity for animal-derived products.
Ella was first in her age group in her school triathlon.
She does ballet, swimming, athletics, and yesterday she sat a National Certificate of Educational Achievement examination in Maori.
"I don't think it's true. I think he's just saying that because he's been paid to say it by the meat industry," she said. "What he said was really silly."
Full story:
www.stuff.co.nz
Additional story:
www.scoop.co.nz

(US) Meat Too Tough To Eat (28/08/06)

It's come to this. In mid-August, the Food and Drug Administration approved the spraying of live viruses onto poultry and meat products. The virus spray, manufactured by a Baltimore company called Intralytix, contains six different viral strains designed to kill listeria, a germ that sickens an estimated 2,500 Americans yearly. Meat companies do not have to inform consumers which products have been treated and which have not.
As a doctor, I would like to call for a reality check.
Decades ago, we learned that the fat and cholesterol in meat boost the amount of cholesterol in consumers' blood. And that leads to heart attacks. So doctors advised us to cut back on meat and get to know vegetables.
Then it was carcinogens. As meat is grilled, cancer-causing chemicals called heterocyclic amines form on its surface, suggesting an explanation for the higher cancer rates in meat-eaters, compared with vegetarians. Chicken turned out to produce much higher levels of carcinogens than beef.
...
And now, to kill some of the germs that come from an animal's intestinal tract and land on a piece of meat containing saturated fat and cholesterol, we need to spray the meat with viruses. It's time to wake up and smell the problem. Millions of Americans now say no to meat. As they do so, their cholesterol levels plummet. Their coronary arteries open up again. Their waistlines shrink, and their cancer rates drop 40 percent. A healthy vegetarian diet could revolutionize the health of the nation.
Full story:
www.courant.com

(UK) There's No Risk to Humans from Soya (08/08/06)

The Hormones in Cow's Milk are Potentially Far More Harmful than those in Plants, says Justine Butler
Felicity Lawrence's article on soya was potentially misleading (Soya: it's in most of the processed food we eat, but is it safe?, July 25). Lawrence described how a dead parrot in New Zealand led Dr Mike Fitzpatrick to investigate the safety of phytoestrogens (plant hormones) in soya. She didn't mention that he is a director of the Weston A Price Foundation, a body that promotes traditional farming and the consumption of butter, eggs, whole milk, meat and saturated animal fat. It is also responsible for a long-running campaign against soya.
Full story:
www.guardian.co.uk

(US) The Truth About Losing Weight On A Vegetarian Diet (24/07/06)

"It does not matter what you eat. Just don't eat a lot, exercise, and your weight will not be a problem." True? Not quite! There is scientific evidence that a vegetarian diet keeps that weight down, whereas meat eaters put it on. What you eat does matter. You know that weight loss is an industry. A money-making industry with many claims to make: Claims of weight loss pills, herbs and juices. Claims of exercise machines and exercise programmes. Claims of high-fat, no fat or lean diets. Which work? Which do not? How to find those things that work? It is bewildering. And expensive! The US FDA has warned against the effectiveness of a number of products that are being marketed. They include fat or starch blockers, weight loss chewing gum and body wraps. Even weight loss earrings and spectacles are in this list. Perhaps the last one is effective when your friends wear them to look at you? By contrast, vegetarians and vegans know what they eat and why they eat it.
...
Recent British scientific research is based on a study of 22,000 people who were followed over five years. All participants put on weight over that time. However, meat eaters who changed to a vegetarian diet gained the least weight. Prof Tim Keys, who led this study for the University of Oxford and Cancer Research UK, obtained interesting results that are contrary to popular beliefs. His study is published in the Journal of Obesity. He said: "Contrary to current popular views that a diet low in carbohydrates and high in protein keeps weight down, we found that the lowest weight gain came in people with high intake of carbohydrates and low intake of protein." The study involved meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans.
Full story:
www.dailyindia.com

(NZ) New Zealand health scientists frustrated by poultry industry 'bullying' (23/07/06)

Scientists say funding problems, covert bullying and a lack of co-operation from the poultry industry are hampering research into health risks associated with chicken. Their claims are hotly denied by the Poultry Industry Association and health officials. Many scientists working on problems including antibiotic resistance in chicken and campylobacter infection, which causes stomach cramps and diarrhoea, have given up or gone overseas in frustration.
This month, the Sunday Star-Times reported that Otago University scientists wanted a ban on the sale of fresh chicken to curb our rocketing campylobacter epidemic. They found up to 90% of the country's chicken is swarming with the disease, and human infection rates here are the highest in the world. Otago University microbiologist Greg Cook, who found antibiotic resistant bacteria in chicken could be passed to humans, has abandoned the work after being unable to get funding.
Full story:
www.stuff.co.nz

(US) Exploring Diet’s Role in Colon Cancer Risk (18/07/06)

For years, research on colon cancer had linked high intake of fiber to lower risk of colon cancer. Scientists consistently observed that populations consuming diets high in fiber had lower risk for colon cancer.
During the International Research Conference on Food, Nutrition and Cancer in Washington, DC, a spokesman for the nation's leading diet-cancer authority pointed to a shift in the focus of research exploring diet's role in colon cancer risk.
"Until recently, researchers studying colon cancer have concentrated on the potential protective effect of diets high in fiber. Today we see more and more investigations into the harmful effect of diets high in meat," said Jeffrey R. Prince, Vice President for Education for the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR).
Full story:
www.nutritionhorizon.com 

(US) Foods that feed your brain (15/07/06)

As you read this, a fatty acid called EPA is helping regulate your blood pressure, immune system, heart health plus various organ functions throughout your body. A related substance, DHA, is an important building block in your brain and eye and is essential in helping you think and see. For you men, DHA is also a component of sperm. EPA and DHA are members of the omega-3 family of fats that is commonly found in seafood. Yet, many people are finding plenty of sound reasons to forgo fish nowadays. Seafood is known to be a concentrated source of contaminants...and a primary source of food-borne illness. There are also some compelling ecological and ethical arguments for avoiding fish.
Fortunately, including seafood in our diet is not essential to our health. Apart from eating fish, there are ways to obtain the two long-chain omega-3 fatty acids that do such important jobs for us. Our bodies can build EPA and DHA from alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), another member of the omega-3 family, which is found in flaxseed, hempseed, walnuts, canola oil and soy. A good choice is to include one of the following in your daily diet: two teaspoons of flaxseed oil, two tablespoons of ground flaxseed, or a handful of walnuts (1-2 ounces).
Full story:
www.commonground.ca

(US) Human 'Mad Cow' Could Cause Eventual Epidemic (22/06/06)

Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or vCJD, the human form of "mad cow disease," has a long incubation period and could cause an eventual epidemic, researchers report.
Reporting in the June 24 issue of the Lancet, they looked at a similar disease - linked to cannibalism - to better understand the impact such an epidemic might have.
Mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), is caused by misfolded brain proteins called prions, which cows contract through contaminated feed. Humans can catch the human form the disease, vCJD, by eating contaminated beef. So far, the fatal degenerative illness has infected about 160 people in the United Kingdom. More cases have been confirmed in six other countries, including the United States.
Now, researchers at University College London have determined, through the study of a similar disease, that BSE has an incubation period of more than 50 years before it actively becomes vCJD.
Full story:
www.cbc.ca
Additional story:
www.cbc.ca

(US) Vegan Women Less Likely to Have Twins (21/05/06)

Washington DC (AHN) - A U.S. researcher stated on Saturday that women, who follow a strict vegetarian diet that excludes all animal products, including milk, are one-fifth as likely to have twins as other women.
Dr. Gary Steinman, an obstetrician specializing in multiple-birth pregnancies at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, New York, stated that the reason may be hormones given to cattle to boost their milk and meat production.
Steinman said, "All animals, including people, produce a compound called insulin-like growth factor or IGF in response to growth hormone. It is found in milk and it increases the sensitivity of the ovaries to follicle stimulating hormone, thus increasing ovulation."
According to Steinman, vegan women have about a 13 percent lower level of IGF in the blood than women who consume dairy."
Full story:
www.allheadlinenews.com

(UK) Mad cow disease 'a threat to tens of millions in Britain' (19/05/06)

Tens of millions more Britons are at risk of contracting the human form of mad cow disease than originally thought, raising fears over the safety of blood products and surgery.
Scientists had believed that only 40 per cent of the population with a specific gene type were susceptible to vCJD, the human form of the cattle disease BSE. But they recently discovered that the disease can lie dormant for decades in other people.
Full story:
http://news.scotsman.com
Additional stories:
www.upi.com
www.allheadlinenews.com

(US) Producers: Diet trends aggravate U.S. meat glut (16/05/06)

Too much of a good thing isn't good for anyone. That goes for protein, too. After years of people stuffing themselves with chicken, pork and beef while they were following low-carb diets like Atkins, the meat industry is looking at a glut as the diet trend turns toward a more balanced approach.
Benchmark wholesale prices for beef and pork are down more than 8 percent from a year ago and 20 percent for chicken, according to the Livestock Marketing Information Center.
"There is just an overabundance of protein on the market," the center's Jim Robb said.
...
Consumers are increasingly shunning high-protein diets like Atkins and South Beach, which have been lauded for inducing rapid weight loss but criticized for raising the intake of fats and cholesterol.
"The popularity of high-protein, low-carb diets gave an extra kick to demand for meats," said Ronald Plain, professor of agricultural economics at the University of Missouri in Columbia.
"Now we're in a situation in 2006 where we see an increase in meat production and that (diet) popularity is going away, so the Atkins diet turned out to be like other diets, a passing fad," Plain said.
Full story:
http://nwitimes.com

(CN) China's happy vegetarian turns 120 (26/04/06)

LESHAN, China (UPI) -- Listed in the Guinness World Records as the oldest living person, a Chinese woman has marked her 120th birthday.
Celebrating her birthday Saturday with dozens of relatives and locals in the city of Leshan, Sichuan province, Du Pinhua said she has been vegetarian for her whole life, China Daily reported Wednesday.
Full story:
www.upi.com

(US) Shocking News for Meat Eaters (26/04/06)

...Since 2000, America's agribusiness firms have donated over 140 million dollars to candidates running for Congress and the Presidency. In 2004 alone, the McDonald's Corporation gave 77% of its political donations to Republicans; the National Cattlemen's Beef Association, 81%; National Restaurant Association, 90%. In return the Bush administration and the Republican majority in Congress have worked hard to serve these private interests at the expense of public health.
...
Let's see now, where to begin? The vast majority of USDA beef is primarily fed on corn. The corn is genetically engineered to withstand weather and bugs and to yield more per acre. Genetically engineered food crops have been around for years; corn and soybean are the main cattle and poultry feed. The beef, like chickens, are individually penned or kept in very crowded facilities. This keeps the animals from moving and exercising, therefore fattening the up faster so they get to market sooner. Then the beef is injected with steroids to make them larger for the same reasons. Steroids in the beef have a side effect of compromising the animal's immune system and making them more vulnerable to sickness. So this is remedied by giving the beef large doses of antibiotics. So the end result is, when you are eating beef that is filled with steroids, antibiotics, and that are fed on genetically engineered corn, how can we be surprised at this obesity level, and heart failure in our meat eaters?. So with every juicy bite of a typical hamburger or steak, you are eating artificial concoction of vaccines, steroids, pesticides, herbicides, and GMO grains (genetically modified). Long-term, high-dose antibiotics use in cattle (and in people who eat the antibiotic-laden meat) contributes to the formation of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, commonly known as "super bugs."
Full story:
www.americanchronicle.com

(US) Blaming bats when man may be culprit (26/04/06)

Bats have been getting a bad rap. Last autumn, a team of scientists tied bats to the deadly SARS outbreaks. Bats in China, they said, are likely where the virus hides between human outbreaks. Then, in December, another group of researchers suggested that bats in Africa serve as a reservoir for the vicious virus for Ebola hemorrhagic fever, which causes its human victims to bleed to death.
But as researchers have worked to uncover the mysterious links between bats and these emerging viruses, they say they have stumbled upon an even wilier culprit working behind the scenes: humans. It now seems that these outbreaks, and likely many others, were set off when people encroached on rain forests, expanded wild animal markets, or made other changes that removed the natural barriers that keep diseases at bay.
"This is not a wildlife problem, it is a human problem," said Jonathan 
Epstein, an American researcher who spoke by phone from Bangladesh, where he has been investigating the causes of Nipah outbreaks.
The insights that are coming from these outbreaks are feeding an emerging discipline that seeks to redefine the very meaning of health. Epstein and other proponents of this thinking, which they have dubbed "conservation medicine," argue that it is impossible to divorce human health from that of the environment. Emerging viruses like the one that causes SARS are symptoms of the drastic, large-scale changes humans are making in the life of the planet.
As researchers do their detective work around the world, they are finding connections between human society and disease. Global warming could push mosquito-borne diseases like malaria and encephalitis into more northern countries. One new bat-borne disease, the Nipah virus, was tied to the expansion of pig farming in Malaysia. Outbreaks of avian flu have been tied to farms, and the disease's spread has been helped by farmers reluctant to come forward with sick birds.
Full story:
www.iht.com

(DE) Eat more fruits, vegetables to avoid wrinkles (18/04/06)

People who eat lots of fruit and vegetables are likely to have fewer wrinkles, says a new study.
People with a normal diet can make their skin look younger by including lots of tomatoes and red paprika in their meals, German magazine The Dermatologist said in its latest issue. Free radicals - unstable oxygen molecules - are a major factor in premature skin aging and skin cancer. Antioxidants contained in the body stop free-radical damage.
However, the body cannot produce enough antioxidants on its own and has to make up for them with ingredients such as Vitamins A, C, D and E as well as beta-carotene.
Vegetables such as carrots, tomatoes, paprika and kale contain plenty of antioxidants, as does green tea.
A study conducted at the Berlin Charite hospital found that people with a high concentration of antioxidants in the skin look younger because they have fewer wrinkles, The Dermatologist said. The study showed that vegetarians had more antioxidants in their bodies than non-vegetarians.
Full story:
www.mumbaimirror.com 

(US) Mad-cow firewall has gaps, consumer groups say (17/04/06)

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - One of the main safeguards against mad cow disease, a ban on using cattle parts in cattle feed, is ineffective or is not enforced strictly, two U.S. consumer groups said on Monday in light of a new case of the fatal bovine ailment in Canada.
Both groups urged more stringent rules on the ingredients allowed in livestock feed and stronger enforcement of the existing feed ban.
"The feed ban is not a firewall," said Michael Hansen of Consumers Union. Canada's three most recent cases of mad cow disease involved cattle born after U.S. and Canadian rules against using cattle parts in feed were announced in 1997.
Full story:
http://today.reuters.com

(US) US cattle markets shaken by suspect Canada mad cow (13/04/06)

CHICAGO (Reuters) - A possible new case of mad cow disease in Canada rattled the U.S. cattle markets on Thursday because the animal in question was born after a 1997 feed ban that was enacted to prevent the disease.
Investors fretted that the discovery, which could be the fifth native-born case of the brain-wasting bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in Canada, could shake consumer confidence in the $200 billion U.S. beef and cattle production industry.
Full story:
http://today.reuters.com

(UK) High meat diet 'can stress baby' (02/04/06)

High protein, low carbohydrate diets should be avoided during pregnancy as they can lead to more stressed offspring, research suggests.
A UK team followed a group of 86 children born in 1967-8 to mothers who were told to eat a pound of red meat a day to avoid pregnancy complications.
The study found the more meat the mother ate, the higher the levels of stress hormone cortisol in the child. 
Full story:
http://news.bbc.co.uk

(US) New scientific review shows vegetarian diets cause major weight loss (01/04/06)

WASHINGTON -- A scientific review in April's Nutrition Reviews shows that a vegetarian diet is highly effective for weight loss. Vegetarian populations tend to be slimmer than meat-eaters, and they experience lower rates of heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and other life-threatening conditions linked to overweight and obesity. The new review, compiling data from 87 previous studies, shows the weight-loss effect does not depend on exercise or calorie-counting, and it occurs at a rate of approximately 1 pound per week.
Rates of obesity in the general population are skyrocketing, while in vegetarians, obesity prevalence ranges from 0 percent to 6 percent, note study authors Susan E. Berkow, Ph.D., C.N.S., and Neal D. Barnard, M.D., of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM).
The authors found that the body weight of both male and female vegetarians is, on average, 3 percent to 20 percent lower than that of meat-eaters.
Full story:
www.eurekalert.org

(AU) Calcium, dairy unlikely to aid in weight loss (28/03/06)

A new study does not support the theory that a boost in calcium intake or dairy consumption is useful for maintaining or losing weight.
"Media have been promoting dairy to lose weight and therefore this topic has gained a lot of importance," Dr. Swapni N. Rajpathak, who led the study, told Reuters Health. "At this time, there is not enough justification to increase dairy intake to lose weight," the researcher warned.
Full story:
http://theage.com.au

(PK) Vegetarian Diet Not Daunting to Adopt (23/03/06)

ISLAMABAD: Contrary to popular belief, it's easy for people to switch from a regular diet to a vegetarian diet that's good for the heart.
So says a study in the summer issue of the Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation.
"For people battling overweight and heart disease, a vegetarian diet can be a lifesaving prescription," study author Dr. Neal D. Barnard, president of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, said in a prepared statement.
"This new study shows that patients transition smoothly to a plant-based diet that allows them to eat to satiety and yet still lose weight.
Full story:
http://paktribune.com

(UK) Low-carb diets can be unhealthy (17/03/06)

LONDON - Low carbohydrate, high protein diets may help to shed weight quickly but researchers warn that they can be unhealthy.
The diets can cause constipation, diarrhoea, headache, bad breath and ketosis, which causes raised levels of ketones, or acids, in the body.
"Low-carbohydrate diets for weight management are far from healthy," said Lyn Steffen and Jennifer Nettleton, of the University of Minnesota School of Public Health in Minneapolis, writing in the British Medical Journal.
They cited the unpleasant effects and a lack of trials to test the long-term effects of low-carbohydrate diets.
Full story:
http://theage.com.au

(UK) Switching to vegetarian keeps weight down: study (13/03/06)

LONDON - If you want to keep the weight down, switch to a meat-free diet, scientists said on Tuesday.
Researchers, who studied the eating habits of 22,000 people over five years, including meat eaters and vegetarians, found they all put on a few kilos but meat eaters who changed to a vegetarian or vegan diet gained the least.
"Contrary to current popular views that a diet low in carbohydrates and high in protein keeps weight down, we found that the lowest weight gain came in people with high intake of carbohydrates and low intake of protein," said Professor Tim Key.
The research compared weight gain among meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans -- who eat no animal products -- and is published in the International Journal of Obesity.
...
"The weight gain was less in the vegans than in the meat-eaters and somewhere in between in the other groups," said Key, of Britain's Cancer Research UK charity and the University of Oxford, who conducted the study.
"The lowest weight gain was in people who changed their diet to eat fewer animal products," he told Reuters.
Full story:
www.khaleejtimes.com

(AT) Bird flu spreads to Poland, infects cats in Austria (06/03/06)

WARSAW (Reuters) - Avian flu extended its spread across Europe as Poland confirmed on Monday that two dead swans had the virulent H5N1 virus and Austria reported that several cats had been infected.
Experts from the World Health Organisation (WHO), meeting in Geneva, said the spread of bird flu was unprecedented and the threat of a human pandemic would not go away.
China said on Sunday the H5N1 virus had killed a man in southern Guangdong province, which borders Hong Kong. There had been no reported outbreaks in birds in the area where he died and experts in Hong Kong urged authorities to find the source.
The WHO has previously confirmed 94 human deaths from bird flu since late 2003. The virus remains essentially an animal disease which humans contract through close contact with infected birds.
However, the virus is mutating and there are fears it may eventually change enough to be transmitted easily from human to human.
Full story:
http://today.reuters.co.uk

(US) Tainted feed blamed in Canada's mad cow case (03/03/06)

WASHINGTON - Canada's latest case of mad cow disease probably came from tainted feed, raising questions about safeguards designed to keep the disease from spreading.
Canada confirmed its fourth case of the disease in January. The cow was born in 2000, three years after Canada banned cattle protein in cattle feed.
The cow's age raises questions about the effectiveness of the ban, because the disease spreads only when cattle eat feed containing certain tissue from infected cattle.
Full story:
http://msnbc.msn.com

(UK) More Britons worried about eating chicken: survey (01/03/06)

LONDON (Reuters) - Worries about eating chicken were mounting among Britain's increasingly health-conscious consumers even before Europe's latest bird flu scare, a survey showed on Wednesday.
Some 57 percent of respondents said they were worried about the safety of chicken meat, up 6 percent from the previous year, according to the national poll by the UK's Food Standards Agency conducted between September 5 and October 16.
...
Britain has had a series of food debacles in recent years, including mad cow disease, or BSE, in the 1990s and foot-and-mouth in 2001, and the poll showed more UK consumers were trying to eat more healthily.
Full story:
http://abcnews.go.com

(FR) Bird flu hits the land of foie gras (25/02/06)

PARIS - The European Union's first outbreak of lethal H5N1 bird flu in commercial poultry was confirmed Saturday in France, the EU's largest poultry producer.
France's farming ministry said lab tests confirmed H5N1 in turkeys at a farm in the southeast Ain region, where thousands of the birds were found dead Thursday. The farm, which had more than 11,000 turkeys, has been sealed off and surviving birds slaughtered.
...
In an indication of the global impact of the French case, Japan had already on Friday temporarily suspended imports of French poultry, including the delicacy foie gras, meat and other internal organs, according to the Japanese Embassy in Paris. In 2005, Japan imported 1,510 metric tons of duck and other poultry meat and 377 metric tons of internal organs, including foie gras, from France.
Full story:
http://msnbc.msn.com

(AU) Bottom of the Harbour: The Law of Toxic Fish (15/02/06)

On 24 January 2006, a temporary ban was placed by the New South Wales government on commercial fishing in Sydney Harbour after tests revealed high dioxin levels in fish. The ban is to remain in force for 3 months, or until further expert advice allows the ban to be lifted. Dioxins are a group of chlorinated chemicals typically emanating as a byproduct from industrial processes, such as combustion of chlorine. Dioxins can remain in the environment for a long time and will accumulate in the body fat of animals and humans, with potentially serious adverse health consequences. ...in response to the question: "Do dioxins concentrate through the food chain?": dioxins increase in concentration (bioaccumulate) as they migrate up the food chain, and humans are at the top of the food chain.
Full story:
www.foodlegal.com.au

(US) Not milk? (06/02/06)

If you can't imagine life without a daily dose of dairy, consider new research that questions the value--if not the safety--of this dietary staple
...
You know it like the Pledge of Allegiance: "Milk helps build strong teeth and bones."
But does it really? Or, as nutrition researchers from Harvard and Cornell Universities are radically suggesting: Have we all been duped by the dairy industry's slick, celebrity-driven "got milk?" advertising campaign?
Milk, the sacred cow of the American diet, is under attack and not just by animal-rights activists. Though federal dietary guidelines and most mainstream nutrition experts recommend that people age 9 or older drink three glasses of milk a day, researchers are examining the role of dairy in everything from rising osteoporosis rates, Type 1 diabetes and heart disease to breast, prostate and ovarian cancer.
Full story:
www.chicagotribune.com

(US) 'Downer Cows' Entering Meat Supply, USDA Inspector General Says (02/02/06)

U.S. government inspectors sometimes allow cattle that can't walk to be slaughtered, contrary to rules aimed at preventing mad-cow disease, the Agriculture Department's Inspector General said in a report.
The inspector general said that at two of 12 slaughter plants reviewed in an audit, 29 non-ambulatory cattle were slaughtered over a 10-month period, and that 20 had been identified as 'downers' with no records of acute injury.
This violates USDA policy that excludes "all non-ambulatory disabled cattle from the human food supply," the IG said as part of a 118-page review of how the department enforces rules meant to prevent mad-cow disease. The report, which said the USDA must also improve record-keeping, was released on the Inspector General's Web site.
Full story:
www.bloomberg.com

(UK) Why red meat raises cancer risk (01/02/06)

Researchers believe they have discovered why eating lots of red meat can raise the risk of bowel cancer.
Scientists at the Dunn Human Nutrition Unit and the Open University compared a red meat diet and a vegetarian diet.
Their study, published in Cancer Research, found the red meat diet was associated with a higher level of damage to the body's DNA.
In the latest study the same Dunn team examined cells from the lining of the colon taken from healthy volunteers eating different diets.
They found higher levels of DNA damage in the cells taken from people eating red meat.
Full story:
http://news.bbc.co.uk

(US) Animal scares create demand for vegetarian ingredients (13/01/06)

Food safety fears have led to the emergence a new market in vegetarian supplement ingredients, and industry insiders predicting that as many as half of all ingredients could be non-animal derived in the next ten years.
Scares such as BSE in cattle and avian 'flu in poultry have prompted consumers and marketers to cast about for supplements containing no animal derivatives, and that means ingredient companies are having to reconsider the carriers they use or develop synthetic variants or seek out vegetarian sources for many of their products.
Full story:
www.foodnavigator-usa.com

(UK) Eating veg 'cuts blood pressure' (10/01/06)

A vegetable-rich diet can help to reduce blood pressure, researchers say.
A team led by Imperial College London, which studied 4,680 people aged 40-59, said it was not clear why eating more vegetable protein had such an effect.
But amino acids - the building blocks of protein - or vegetable components, like magnesium, may be key, they said.
However, they found no strong evidence that high meat consumption is linked to high blood pressure. The study features in Archives of Internal Medicine.
"Understanding more about these vegetarian proteins could help guide us in how to prevent or treat heart and circulatory disease and allow us to lead an appropriate healthy lifestyle."
Full story:
http://news.bbc.co.uk
Additional story:
www.healthday.com

ANIMAL WELFARE

(US) Animal sentience: They think, feel pain (10/11/06)

Recent news that Happy, a 34-year-old Asian elephant, recognized herself in a giant, shatter-proof mirror at the Bronx Zoo is just the latest in a burgeoning list of eye-opening revelations into the minds and motivations of other beings. Recent studies have shown that mice empathize with familiar mice who are suffering, that captive male monkeys will hand over a bottle of fruit juice for a chance to ogle photos of female monkeys' bottoms and that rats accustomed to being tickled will come running for more, making high-pitched chirps linked to the origins of human laughter.
The once-long list of uniquely human traits is dwindling almost as fast as you can say "human supremacy." Tool use is widespread in nature. Animals also have their own cultures, and they may show malice, or compassion, for others. They deceive, tease, pretend and celebrate, and they exhibit a broad range of emotions including grief, gratitude, jealousy, joy and embarrassment. Because animals are sentient - because they can feel fear and pain, pleasure and joy - it follows that to them, their lives have value. It matters little what their IQ is. Their pain and pleasure are akin to yours and mine, and their will to live is just as strong. If animals experience the world essentially as we do, can we really justify harming and killing them for our own interests?
Full story:
www.miami.com

(US) Resident liberates the lobsters (13/10/06)

Douglas Tabler of Eureka was disturbed about lobsters being held in the new North Coast Co-op store in Eureka and decided to take action Thursday by shipping them home ... to Maine.
It all started after the death of his two cats last month.
"I had a breakthrough after my two cats died. I missed them so much; I realized that they were part of our family and so much like me, just in a different form."
Tabler said that after the new Co-op opened, he and his companion Sheri Johnson went in to look around and do a little shopping.
"When I saw the lobsters in the tank, they were all huddled together. I felt like they were communicating to me and they were afraid," Tabler explained. "Right then I saw that we are all the same. We have the same feelings, but we are in different forms."
Tabler said that he went to the service desk and spoke with Co-op manager Larry Crabb about the situation.
"He told me that a woman had come in a day earlier and said the same thing. It made a lot of people uncomfortable, especially vegetarians."
Tabler, who is a vegan, said he was protesting at the store for several days and decided to take action.
...
"My brother is going to drive them to Maine," Nichols added. "It's definitely one of the most unusual calls I've received. But, I feel that people can choose what they believe in. I support their right to take action. It's a symbolic gesture for Douglas to send the lobsters back."
Full story:
www.eurekareporter.com

(AU) The real price of our cheap eggs (03/10/06)

They spend their entire lives in a space three-quarters the size of an A4 sheet of paper in wire boxes in dimly lit sheds.
The cramped conditions make their bones so brittle they have trouble supporting their own weight. At one day old their beaks are often sliced off by a hot guillotine to stop them pecking each other to death.
And after a year in these nightmarish conditions, during which time they will lay an egg every day, they are slaughtered for pet meat.
The horrifying truth behind Australia's $300 million battery hen industry has prompted the RSPCA to launch a new campaign against cagelaid eggs.
Switzerland has already banned battery cages and the rest of Europe, including Britain, plans to phase them out by 2012.
But in Australia there are no plans to crack down on the industry. And Australian shoppers seem happy to choose cheaper "cage eggs" over barn-laid or free-range produce, which can cost 50 per cent more.
The RSPCA will today shift the focus of its long-running campaign against cage eggs from government regulators to the 85 per cent of Australian consumers who buy the cheaper eggs.
...
Animal Liberation executive director Mark Pearson said consumers could avoid supporting the practice of de-beaking by buying certified organic eggs.
He said de-beaking was unnecessary if farmers did not cram animals into small spaces.
Full story:
www.thewest.com.au

(NZ) Urban consumers will steer animal welfare - Anderton (25/08/06)

Urban consumers with little understanding of life on a farm are likely to increasingly influence the welfare of production animals, says Agriculture Minister Jim Anderton.
"They have clear views of what is acceptable to them, and what is not, and they will vote with their wallets," he said yesterday.
And these views were likely to challenge many practices associated with intensification of production systems, because many New Zealanders were increasingly losing touch with farming.
"If you ask an Auckland teenager where milk comes from, they'll probably say 'the fridge' or 'the supermarket'," Mr Anderton told a workshop held in Wellington by the National Animal Welfare Advisory Committee (NAWAC), which advises him.
Mr Anderton said the agricultural sector had to appreciate the role that public opinion played in shaping animal welfare, but at the same time keep welfare measures "demonstrably practical and effective" for farmers in New Zealand conditions.
And he called on farmers to be pro-active: "We should not be waiting for consumers as far away as the European Union to dictate the animal welfare standards on New Zealand farms".
Full story:
www.stuff.co.nz

(NZ) Cruel hen cages move closer to phase-out (09/05/06)

Hens have now been given a better chance to live out their egg-laying lives within more humane conditions, Green Party MP Sue Kedgley said.
"I am delighted that Parliament's Regulations Review committee has recommended to Government that the Layer Hen code be re-written, so that it complies with the Animal Welfare Act, and that a date be set for the phasing out of current layer hen cages.
"Effectively this will mean the industry now has to go back to the drawing board and devise a code that does comply with the Animal Welfare Act," Ms Kedgley said.
"It will also mean that the industry now finally has to set a date to phase out layer hen cages, instead of endlessly procrastinating on the issue.
"Hens can't even turn around in layer hen cages, or stretch their wings or express normal patterns of behaviour. It's a travesty that such cruel kinds of cages should be permitted at all under the Animal Welfare Act, and I am delighted that the committee had the courage to acknowledge that they don't comply."
Full story:
www.scoop.co.nz
Related stories:
www.radionz.co.nz
www.scoop.co.nz

(UK) Dolphins ‘know each other’s names’ (07/05/06)

Dolphins may be closer to humans than previously realised, with new research showing they communicate by whistling out their own "names".
The evidence suggests dolphins share the human ability to recognise themselves and other members of the same species as individuals with separate identities. The research, on wild bottlenose dolphins, will lead to a reassessment of their intelligence and social complexity, raising moral questions over how they should be treated.
Full story:
www.timesonline.co.uk

(CN) Chinese scientists clone mad cow-resistant calf (26/04/06)

BEIJING (Reuters) - Chinese scientists have succeeded in cloning a cow with gene cells resistant to mad cow disease, the official Xinhua news agency said on Wednesday.
The birth of the 55-kg (121-lb) calf in the eastern province of Shandong comes three years after a team led by now-disgraced South Korean scientist Hwang Woo-suk cloned cows with a protein structure resistant to bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE).
...
State television reported that further tests would be required on the calf as it grows to verify the effectiveness of the transplanted genes.
Full story:
http://abcnews.go.com

(UK) Straw poll highlights key to healthy cows (11/03/06)

The modern dairy cow can produce huge amounts of milk and yields of more than 10,000 litres are not uncommon. However, this phenomenal increase in production has come at the cost of reduced fertility, lameness and a wide range of health problems.
The brutal fact is that the modern cow is unlikely to last much beyond three lactations and is a potential welfare public relations disaster, as some animal rights organisations are now pointing out.
But it is not the cow's fault that she is prone to so many problems, according to Professor David Beever, an internationally renowned nutritionist who acts as a consultant with Richard Keenan, the Irish feed wagon manufacturer.
Speaking at the Royal Dick Veterinary College in Edinburgh, Prof Beever said: "There has been a tremendous advance in the genetics of the dairy cow, but it is unfair to blame the modern Holstein for all her difficulties and health issues. The fact is that neither cow management nor nutrition have kept pace with genetic progress."
Full story:
http://business.scotsman.com

(AU) Scientists designing the perfect dairy cow (24/02/06)

Scientists in Australia have made a breakthrough in the quest to genetically engineer the perfect dairy herd by discovering how to multiply and isolate stem cells found in cow embryos.
Stem cells may be used in dairy to improve a cow's udder health and milk yield, whilst also offering a new way of vaccinating animals against disease.
"In the future, stem cells will be able to be tested to determine if they carry the genes likely to produce elite animals," Dairy CRC said.
The research group has filed an international patent application to safeguard its new technology.
CRC also announced last November it was part of state-funded research to examine bioactive material in milk, with a view to developing new ideas for functional dairy products.
Full story:
www.foodnavigator-usa.com

(UK) Flying in the face of nature (22/02/06)

Migrating birds are blamed for bringing avian flu into Europe. But John Vidal finds there is growing consensus that animal farming and man's intrusion into the environment are major factors in the spread of new diseases.
[EXCERPT ...Since 1961, worldwide livestock has increased 38%, to about 4.3 billion today. The global poultry population has quadrupled in that time, to 17.8 billion birds, and the number of pigs has roughly trebled to 2 billion. As the numbers of animals bred for food have vastly grown in a very short period, humankind's relationship with them has changed.
"Raising animals has morphed into an industrial endeavour that bears little relation to landscape or natural tendencies of the animals. Wherever [industrial farming] is introduced it creates ecological and public health disasters," she says. [Danielle Nierenberg, a researcher with the US Worldwatch Institute.]
Caroline Lucas, Green MEP for south-east England, says intensive farming now plays a major role in the spread of diseases. "There is a reduction in the diversity of breeds in order to have the fastest growth, and animals are becoming more susceptible to diseases because of the way they are bred and kept. The search for profits leads to animals and then humans becoming more vulnerable. Our current policies are encouraging farming that overlooks basic husbandry."
"The global poultry industry is clearly linked to avian influenza. It would not have happened without it. There has been an explosion in the global poultry industry. There has always been a close link between people and poultry," he says. [Peter Daszak, director of the Consortium for Conservation Medicine.]
Keeping forests and other ecosystems intact could be the best protection humankind has against new diseases. Intrusions into the world's areas of high biodiversity disturbs biological "reservoirs" and exposes people to new forms of infectious disease, says Diversitas, a group of scientists exploring biodiversity.]
Full story:
www.guardian.co.uk

(US) A sunless hell - Confronting the cruel facts of factory-farmed meat (20/02/06)

Arizona voters will be asked this fall to weigh in on a ballot measure called the Humane Treatment of Farm Animals Act, which is now in the signature-gathering stage but, by November, is certain to be one of our livelier election-year debates.
The initiative, modeled on a reform passed by Florida voters, would prohibit the factory-farming practice of confining pigs and veal calves in crates so small that the animals cannot even turn around or extend their limbs.
Factory farming, in general, is no one's favorite subject, and the details here are particularly unpleasant to think about: masses of creatures enduring lives of unrelieved confinement and deprivation.
But if you're in need of reasons to sign the petitions and vote for the initiative, they are easy to find, and our discomfort with the subject is a good place to start.
Known in the trade as "intensive confinement" or "mass confinement," it sounds pretty rough. And as we're seeing already, pork producers and the PR firms in their hire do not take well to criticism of what they regard as "standard practice."
...
Prepare yourself to hear, in the coming months, these arguments and similar rubbish from industry lobbyists, their shill veterinarians, and anyone else they can trot out to make something pernicious and contemptible seem decent and praiseworthy. Then in the quiet of the voting booth ask yourself why any creature of God, however humble, should be made to endure the dark, lonely, tortured existence of the factory farm, and what kind of people build their fortunes upon such misery.
Full story:
www.azcentral.com

(UK) Reality takes wing over bird flu (17/02/06)

Vested interests mean wild birds are being blamed for the spread of avian flu, argues Dr Leon Bennun in this week's Green Room, whereas responsibility really lies with modern farming. Demands for culling and the destruction of nesting sites threaten, he says, to bring rare species to extinction, but will do nothing to halt the disease.
EXCERPT: There are now calls for drastic measures against wild bird populations. ... I believe these measures would put some species at risk of extinction, without having any effect on the spread of avian flu. .... It may ... be time to take a long, hard look at the way the world feeds itself, and to decide whether the price paid for modern farming in terms of risks to human health and the Earth's biodiversity is too high.
Full story:
http://news.bbc.co.uk

(AU) Tangled turtle dies, aged 150 (16/01/06)

A 150-year-old turtle that came to shore on Victoria's south coast cut and disabled by discarded fishing tackle has died.
Vets and wildlife officers tried desperately to save the two-metre-long, 350kg leatherback - an endangered species - but it died in transit, suffering cuts to its head, rope burns and necrotic, or gangrenous, muscle.
Healesville Sanctuary vet Kelly O'Sullivan said the rare male turtle came to shore near Venus Bay, south-east of Melbourne, on Saturday afternoon.
"He was entangled in discarded fishing and shark nets and he had buoys wrapped around both pectoral fins," Ms O'Sullivan said.
"He also had a long line (attached to him)."
"The injuries were severe."
She said the extent of the injuries resulted from weeks or months of entanglement.
Ms O'Sullivan said the turtle's death should highlight the dangers of discarding fishing nets, long lines and craypots in the ocean, and she urged people to pick up rubbish that could harm marine wildlife.
Full story:
www.theage.com.au

(UK) EU considers food labels to improve animal welfare (11/01/06)

BRUSSELS (Reuters) - European consumers who prefer meat and dairy products from humanely treated animals may soon be able to buy farm produce stamped with an EU "welfare" label.
Noting a "seismic shift" in consumer opinion towards promoting animal welfare rather than merely preventing cruelty and avoidable suffering, the European Commission says it is keen to see more farm products obtained using high welfare standards.
One way to achieve this, it says in a five-year plan to improve treatment of animals, would be to create a label to help consumers choose between "minimum" and "higher" welfare standards for the meat, milk or eggs that they want to buy.
"The establishment of an EU label for animal welfare is an option to be explored in the near future which could promote products elaborated under high welfare standards," it said.
"There has been a clear shift of public attitudes towards animals over recent decades and how animals are considered in society," said the plan, obtained by Reuters.
Full story:
http://today.reuters.co.uk

FOOD & PRODUCTS

(AU) Plenty to beef about (29/05/06)

Australians' voracious appetite for the good old meat pie might ease a little following the latest advice from consumer experts.
Underneath that flaky, golden pastry many brands of meat pie are stuffed with nothing but "unappetising gristle".
To find out just how meaty the average pie really is, Choice magazine put a number of national brands, including the popular Mrs Mac's, Jesters, Big Ben and Four'n'Twenty to the test.
Choice says some pies, including Big Ben Traditional, Sargents Traditional, and Michel's Traditional Minced Beef pies, contained bits of lung tissue, while Homebrand and Vili's Gourmet Beef had other gristle.
The consumer experts also found that some pies were just scraping by on their required meat content.
The Food Standards Code requires that a meat pie must contain at least 25 per cent meat. 
However, as Choice pointed out, this definition can include snouts, ears, tongue roots, tendons and blood vessels.
Full story:
http://thecouriermail.news.com.au

(UK) New labelling guidance taps growing vegetarian demand (07/04/06)

The guidance, drawn up by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) after consultation with stakeholders including The Vegetarian Society and The Vegan Society, will provide criteria for the use of the terms 'vegetarian' and 'vegan' on food labels for the first time.
The FSA estimates that there are 3.5 million vegetarians and 0.25 million vegans in the UK. The guidance is designed to make it easier for these consumers to identify the products that are suitable for them.
It also aims to prevent some common mistakes by companies such as labelling drink or food that has been derived from animal products or fish as suitable for 'vegans' and 'vegetarians'.
"There has been a lot of confusion over the use of the terms 'vegetarian' and 'vegan' on food labels both in the retail and catering sectors," said Dr Richard Harding, head of the FSA's consumer choice, food standards and special projects division.
"The root cause of the problem seems to be the lack of agreed criteria. The guidance aims to improve consistency by providing criteria for the use of these terms in food labelling."
Full story:
www.nutraingredients.com

THE ENVIRONMENT

(UN) Rearing cattle produces more greenhouse gases than driving cars, UN report warns (29/11/06)

Cattle-rearing generates more global warming greenhouse gases, as measured in CO2 equivalent, than transportation, and smarter production methods, including improved animal diets to reduce enteric fermentation and consequent methane emissions, are urgently needed, according to a new United Nations report released today.
"Livestock are one of the most significant contributors to today's most serious environmental problems," senior UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) official Henning Steinfeld said. "Urgent action is required to remedy the situation." 
Cattle-rearing is also a major source of land and water degradation, according to the FAO report, Livestock's Long Shadow–Environmental Issues and Options, of which Mr. Steinfeld is the senior author.
"The environmental costs per unit of livestock production must be cut by one half, just to avoid the level of damage worsening beyond its present level," it warns.
Full story:
www.un.org

(BR) Diet for a hot planet (24/11/06)

Thirty-five years ago, Frances Moore Lappé's revolutionary cookbook, "Diet for a Small Planet," warned of the dire consequences of a growing taste for meat. For example, it takes up to 16 times more farmland to sustain people on a diet of animal protein than on a diet of plant protein.
As American, European and Asian farmers run out of land for crop expansion, her warning rings prophetic. The emerging meat-eaters of the emerging economies - especially China - are driving industrial agriculture into the tropical forests of South America, sending greenhouse gases skyward in a dangerous new linkage between the palate and the warming of the planet.
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The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that all of the cropland of the United States could fit into the South American central plain and Amazon rainforest to the north. So as the growing wealth of China led to a doubling of its meat consumption over the last decade, it has turned to Brazilian soybeans to feed its exploding population of chickens and pigs. India, South Africa, and other emerging economies are on a similar course.
Continental meat-eating habits also deserve some credit for the demise of the Amazon. The European Union created an enormous protein shortfall when it banned the use of animal carcasses in animal ration following outbreaks of mad cow disease. As Chinese imports of soy from Brazil climbed from 0 to 8 million tons in the last decade, European imports went from 3 to 11 million tons.
Full story:
www.iht.com

(US) What you eat matters ... big time (03/11/06)

With this week's new study in Science about the collapse of the world's fisheries, I think it's appropriate once again to examine a topic that doesn't get enough attention: our diets. Not only does eating fish exacerbate the collapse of marine ecosystems and lead to the death of millions of other creatures, including turtles, dolphins, and whales, but the energy used to catch deep-sea fish is equivalent to factory-farmed beef.
That wasn't a typo. Eating most types of fish is like eating Big Macs in terms of the environmental impacts, and probably worse.
...
Vegetarianism isn't for everyone, but if you care about the environment you owe it to yourself to examine your diet and think long and hard about whether meat, poultry, and fish are really all that important to you. Even reducing them in your diet makes a big difference. With amazing vegetarian food available virtually everywhere, you may come to realize you don't even have to sacrifice eating pleasure and satisfaction.
Full story:
http://gristmill.grist.org

(US) Meat Is a Global Warming Issue (24/08/06)

Put that hamburger down! Our carnivorous habits are partially responsible for the dire threat of global warming.
...
There are many human activities that contribute to global warming. Among the biggest contributors are electrical generation, the use of passenger and other vehicles, over-consumption, international shipping, deforestation, smoking and militarism.
What many people do not know, however, is that the production of meat also significantly increases global warming. Cow farms produce millions of tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane per year, the two major greenhouse gases that together account for more than 90 percent of U.S. greenhouse emissions, substantially contributing to "global scorching."
According to the United Nations Environment Program's Unit on Climate Change, "There is a strong link between human diet and methane emissions from livestock." The 2004 State of the World is more specific regarding the link between animals raised for meat and global warming: "Belching, flatulent livestock emit 16 percent of the world's annual production of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas."
...
Geophysicists Gidon Eshel and Pamela Martin from the University of Chicago concluded that changing one's eating habits from the Standard American Diet (SAD) to a vegetarian diet does more to fight global warming than switching from a gas-guzzling SUV to a fuel-efficient hybrid car. Of course, you can do both. Where the environment is concerned, eating meat is like driving a huge SUV. According to Eshel, eating a vegetarian diet is like driving a mid-sized car or a reasonable sedan, and eating a vegan diet (no dairy, no eggs) is like riding a bicycle or walking. Shifting away from SUVs and SUV-style diets, to much more energy-efficient alternatives, is key to fighting the warming trend.
Full story:
www.alternet.org

(EU) A meaty subject for science (21/04/06)

A Dutch study points out the potential benefits to the environment, including biodiversity, human health and sustainable agriculture, of eating less meat. With obesity expanding across Europe and major questions being raised about biodiversity loss and sustainable food-production practices, these findings give pause for thought.
In their study of more sustainable protein alternatives, researchers from three Dutch universities have worked together to come up with some novel reasons to cut our meat intake. They say we should look to make the transition from meat proteins to vegetable alternatives.
This so-called "protein transition", the scientists suggest, will positively affect everything from sustainable energy production and water use, to biodiversity, human health and animal welfare. They are not calling for "collective vegeterianism", they claim, "but good-tasting, high-quality meat substitutes ought to be used more often".
Full story:
http://ec.europa.eu/research/infocentre

(US) Study Shows Vegan Diets Healthier for Planet, People Than Meat Diets (13/04/06)

CHICAGO -- The food that people eat is just as important as what kind of cars they drive when it comes to creating the greenhouse-gas emissions that many scientists have linked to global warming, according to a report accepted for publication in the journal Earth Interactions.
Both the burning of fossil fuels during food production and non-carbon dioxide emissions associated with livestock and animal waste contribute to the problem, the University of Chicago's Gidon Eshel and Pamela Martin wrote in the report.
The average American diet requires the production of an extra ton and a half of carbon dioxide-equivalent, in the form of actual carbon dioxide as well as methane and other greenhouse gases compared to a strictly vegetarian diet, according to Eshel and Martin. And with Earth Day approaching on April 22, cutting down on just a few eggs or hamburgers each week is an easy way to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, they said.
Full story:
http://newswire.ascribe.org
Related story:
www.ivanhoe.com

MISCELLANEOUS

(IN) Saintly reptile: Crocodile turns vegetarian (26/08/06)

We've all heard of celebrities who turn vegetarian as part of a fad, but here's someone who's become a celebrity purely on the virtue of being vegetarian!
A crocodile in a temple pond in Kasargod in Kerala has now shot to fame locally after news got out that this reptile has no meaty cravings.
He instead makes do with generous helpings of local boiled red rice.
...
Although crocodiles can adapt themselves to different situations, a purely vegetarian crocodile is unheard of.
Full story:
www.ndtv.com

(US) Animal intelligence resists definition (30/06/06)

People generally define intelligence in terms that place our own species at the apex, but recent studies on other animals suggest skills such as abstract thinking, problem solving, reasoning, and language - once thought unique to us - may not be so uncommon after all. "The closer we examine animals, the more they surprise us with their intelligence and awareness," said Jonathan Balcombe, a research scientist at Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine in Washington, DC.
A prevailing view holds that all examples of non-human intelligence are simply conditioned behaviors. Recent studies are putting that view to rest. Linguists have argued that certain patterns of language organization are the exclusive province of humans. Once again, new research is turning that idea on its head. Another quality of human intelligence that many animals appear to share is the capacity for complex emotion. "Gradually we are coming to realize that it's wrong to make other feeling beings suffer for our own selfish interests," Balcombe said. "Might doesn't make right. If a more intelligent race arrived from outer space, would they have the right to torture and kill us? I think not!"
Full story:
http://dsc.discovery.com

(US) Will consumers have a beef with test-tube meat? (27/03/06)

Scientists can grow frog and mouse meat in the lab, and are now working on pork, beef and chicken. Their goal is to develop an industrial version of the process in five years.
If they succeed, cultured or in vitro meat could be coming to a supermarket near you. Consumers could buy hamburger patties and chicken nuggets made from meat cultivated from muscle cells in a giant incubator rather than cut from a farm animal.
Full story:
www.theglobeandmail.com

(US) Atkins Nutritionals out of Bankruptcy (10/01/06)

NEW YORK – Atkins Nutritionals has emerged from bankruptcy with a revised business model that hinges less on the popularity of the low-carb diet espoused by its founder.
The company said it isn't abandoning the legacy of the late diet guru Dr. Robert C. Atkins, who taught that people should eat foods rich in protein and limit their intake of carbohydrates.
But with the anti-carb craze waning, the company is no longer publishing books about the Atkins diet and has jettisoned almost all of a once-broad product line that included low-carb bread, bagels, pasta, cookies and cheesecake.
Its new sole focus is selling Atkins Advantage protein bars and shakes, which have been around since 1997, but have been recently reformulated to taste better, said chief executive officer Mark S. Rodriguez.
...
Founded in 1989 and based in Ronkonkoma, N.Y., Atkins Nutritionals spent five months in bankruptcy protection, trimming $300 million in debt. The company filed papers ending court supervision of the company Tuesday. It emerges with its debt at $110 million.
Full story:
www.signonsandiego.com

 
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